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Surrey’s New City Hall Open for Business

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lalonde surrey city hall

Surrey’s city centre just became more complete with the official opening of the new city hall building on Monday, Feb. 17th at noon.

The 210,000 square foot facility also has a new parkade with 810 parking spots. There will be 750 staff working out of the new location.

It features six storeys of office, meeting and community spaces and among the perks of the new design is its chamber room, which transforms into a theatre space when not in use for council meetings. A public daycare is another of the key amenities.

The structure cost $97-million to build.

Its location, at 13450 104th Avenue, a few minutes’ walk from Surrey Central SkyTrain station and bus loop, is more convenient for public access, according to Barinder Rasode, city counsellor.

“The SkyTrain being here at this point, SFU, the new library and Central City creating this anchor to have good open public space, where we can have festivals and community gatherings, it was a natural choice and it’s been on the books for many, many years,” she said.

The old city hall building, at 14245 56th Avenue, was geographically central but far from any social or cultural axis, said Vincent Lalonde, manager at the City of Surrey.

“It’s the next metropolitan core for the region, so putting the civic government in its core in its city is really something that was a desire.”

While it’s much easier to get to by public transit, the City of Surrey’s online presence has also been transformed to make civic engagement easier.

“Residents don’t all have to come to city hall. We’ve expanded our online services in order for them to access a lot of the services,” he said.

The new facility has community spaces built in to its design, including meeting rooms of different sizes, all equipped with projectors and screens, that members of the public can book.

Efficiency will also be improved as services that were once separate and dealt with at different counters are now unified in a more simplistic process.

“In city hall there’s four service areas, not just in the old city hall, but outside,” explained Lalonde. “So community services was in another building, bylaws was in another building, and so now it’s all combined here.”

On the main floor is a service counter mainly for financial transactions such as dog licensing or paying fines. Another counter, on the second floor, helps residents with varying needs.

“We amalgamated services out of four areas all into city hall now. The counters are much more multi purpose,” said Lalonde.

While it’s open for business, there are still finishing touches taking place.

For residents that mistakenly go to the old city hall, there is still a service counter open that can take care of most requests.

A grand public opening event will take place on April 26th in conjunction with the City’s Party for the Planet festival.

The new city hall is a key element of the Build City Centre Strategy, which includes a number of significant projects such as the City Centre Library, SFU and 3 Civic Plaza, still under construction at City Parkway and 104th Avenue.

It will feature a 144 room hotel, condominium units, commercial spaces and a 50 storey office tower, which will be Surrey’s tallest building and the fifth tallest in the lower mainland. Its construction is expected to be complete in early 2016.

Bronwyn has lived in Ottawa, P.E.I., Victoria, Squamish and Surrey, B.C. She has an English degree (SFU, 2011) and a journalism degree (Langara College, 2013) and for four years worked with Sandra Djwa on Journey with No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page, which won the Governor-General’s Non-Fiction prize in 2013. She’s an adventurous spirit who loves the outdoors and all things artsy. She’s written for the Surrey Leader, the Langley Times and The Squamish Reporter.

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2019 Surrey Report Card: Councillor Gives Mayor’s Team a D for Transit and F for Proposed Police Department

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More and more of us in Surrey believe our city is headed in the wrong direction: Councillor Linda Annis

Surrey, BC: In her 2019 report card for city hall, Councillor Linda Annis has given Mayor Doug McCallum and his four Safe Surrey councillors a D when it comes to transit and an “F” for the proposed Surrey Police Department.

“The mayor said he could get Skytrain from Surrey city centre to Langley for the $1.65 billion that had been allocated to LRT, but that turned out to be completely untrue and wasn’t even close to reality,” said Annis. “Instead, we’re getting only four stations and everything stops at 164th, with no new funding for at least the next 10 years. That means no significant transit improvements for neighbourhoods such as Newton, Cloverdale, Clayton, Campbell Heights and South Surrey. Frankly, when it comes to transit the mayor and his Safe Surrey councillors haven’t delivered as our city continues to grow. As a result, we’ll continue to be a city that spends more time in our cars than people living in Vancouver or other Lower Mainland cities.”

Annis said that while there’s growing disappointment about transit, she believes the proposed Surrey Police Department is the single biggest city hall failure in 2019.

“I think the idea of the SPD and the way the mayor is dealing with it deserves a failing grade,” said Annis. “There’s nothing about the transition report that gives anyone any confidence that we’re spending money wisely, or even solving a policing or public safety problem. The mayor and his four councillors have ignored the community, ignored taxpayers, and are trying to ram through the SPD at any cost. You only have to look at the new city budget to see that the transition to the SPD is swallowing up every available dollar, which means no new police, no new firefighters, and no new rinks, parks or community centres. Meanwhile, we’re continuing to grow, but cutting back on police and firefighters. Frankly, taxpayers are getting shortchanged. It just doesn’t make any sense, and, if the SPD is actually created, it will have fewer officers than our current Surrey RCMP detachment. It’s a financial nightmare and there are no answers from the mayor and his team. As a result, I think by any measure the proposed SPD plan deserves an F.”

Annis added that when it comes to housing affordability in Surrey, new city taxes and charges to developers that are passed on to home buyers only work to make Surrey less affordable. Consequently, when it comes to affordability, Annis gives city hall a D in her 2019 report card.

“Politicians talk a good game when it comes to affordability, but increased city taxes and the growing number of charges from Surrey city hall to local developers are simply being passed on to people looking to buy a home,” noted Annis. “Here in Surrey, those taxes and extra costs are nothing more than a cash grab to help fund the transition to the SPD. In the end, taxpayers and new home buyers pay the costs, and affordability goes out the window.”

Outlining her priorities for 2020, Annis said ethics, better transit, public safety, smart development, youth at risk and new schools are among her top priorities. Over the coming year, Annis said she will be advocating for:

  • Hiring the promised ethics commissioner for the City of Surrey
  • Complete transparency around the proposed SPD and its costs, with a public referendum that gives taxpayers the final say
  • More and better transit for Surrey neighbourhoods
  • Smart development that ensures Surrey is creating a community where people can work, live and play, with less commuting to jobs outside of Surrey
  • Zero tolerance for school portables, with the City being more proactive with the Province and school board
  • More transitional housing for the homeless

“Our community is continuing to grow and we’ve got tremendous potential, but we have to make better decisions about our future and make sure we’re getting it right, particularly when it comes to transit, policing and development,” explained Annis. “I’ve always believed that the mayor and council are elected to listen to our voters and taxpayers. That transparency is key, but we’re seeing less and less public input, engagement or consultation and that’s no way to build a better city. I’m hoping that in 2020 we’ll see politicians at city hall listen more and talk less, ensuring Surrey residents always have the final say about their future.”

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BC Libertarian Party Assembles to Drive Change

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Dustin Murray walked into his first BC Libertarian party meeting hoping to meet like minded thinkers for change in the province, but walked out as the parties Surrey-Delta-Langley treasurer. The party met Sunday afternoon to discuss and approve the party bylaws, as well as elect three new members for the Surrey Delta Langley location.

The president, and vice president were both filled by two elected party members. Alex Joel filled the position as president and Jesse Batsford filled the position of vice president. But once the position of treasurer was open, the last member of the party present declined the offer allowing Dustin Murray to step in and hold the position.

“I can’t sit around and do nothing, so I’m here to do something,” said Murray.

Once the member of the party voted Murray as treasurer, Murray finally handed in his application to be a formal member of the BC Libertarian Party, along with his five dollar application fee. Dr. Kenneth Van Dewark, who hold the regional caucus chair and lead the meeting, traded Murrays application with the parties treasurer paperwork which Murray swiftly signed at the bottom.

(L) Dustin Murray – Treasurer, Don Wilson – Party leader, Alex Joel – president and Jesse Batsford – vice president

(L) Dustin Murray – Treasurer, Alex Joel – president and Jesse Batsford – vice president

Murray’s role as treasurer is purely ceremonial for the party but Murray said he is still looking forward to create action in little ways for his family and himself. Murray is one of a handful of new members that joined Sunday afternoon. While the party has been around since 1986, the party has only seen a significant growth within the past two years.

“I would say, it (BC Libertarian Party) was more of a book club then a viable political option,” said Dr. Van Dewark. “But I think the situation in BC is, it’s become such that people are hungry for an alternative and the party has become a vehicle for that.”

According to party leader Don Wilson the party has grown for its advocacy on lower taxes, more choice and freedom alternatives. “Free market economics, classical liberal ideas, the protection of property rights and free speech, that’s our focus,” said Wilson.

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Mayor McCallum & City Council approve free parking on streets around Surrey Memorial Hospital and at City Hall Parkade

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Surrey, BC – Surrey City Council unanimously approved two hour free parking for on-street parking around Surrey Memorial Hospital (SMH) and at the City Hall Parkade.

“I firmly believed that people visiting their loved ones at Surrey Memorial Hospital should not pay for parking, nor should our citizens have to pay to park their vehicles when conducting business at their “house,” which is City Hall,” said Mayor Doug McCallum. “This was a promise that my team and I campaigned on and we have taken immediate action to deliver on it.”

With Council’s decision tonight, the 103 on-street pay parking spaces around SMH and up to 165 spaces for the public at the City Hall Parkade are free of charge for the first two hours for visitors. The two hour time limit has been implemented in order to ensure that the spots are being utilized as intended and discourage external users, such as park-and-ride, from occupying the stalls for an extended length of time. The full corporate report can be viewed here.

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City of Surrey only municipality to be named among Canada’s most admired corporate cultures

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Surrey, BC – The City of Surrey has been recognized in the “Broader Public Sector” category and is the only municipality to be named among Canada’s Most Admired Corporate Cultures for 2018.

“To be the only municipality in Canada to receive this award speaks volumes about our employees’ passion and innovation for the work they do,” said Mayor Doug McCallum. “I am glad that our City staff are being recognized for their commitment to deliver superior service to our citizens in Surrey.”

The award is presented annually by Waterstone Human Capital, a leading executive search firm specializing in recruiting for fit and cultural talent management, to companies that demonstrate exemplary performance in vision and leadership; recruitment and hiring for fit; cultural alignment and measurement; retention; rewards and recognition; organizational performance; and corporate social responsibility.

“Our corporate culture is a reflection of the extraordinary things our employees do each and every day,” said Vincent Lalonde, City Manager. “Recognition on this level is a testament to the exceptional efforts of our employees. It’s a real honour for the City of Surrey and its staff to receive this award.”

This national program, now in its 14th year, recognizes best-in-class Canadian organizations for having cultures that have helped them enhance performance and sustain a competitive advantage.

“At Waterstone we believe corporate culture drives performance and that it’s your organization’s greatest asset,” said Marty Parker, President and Chief Executive Officer of Waterstone Human Capital and Chair of Canada’s Most Admired™ Corporate Cultures. “What’s notable about the 2018 winners is their commitment to culture as a competitive advantage. They set an outstanding example for cultivating and sustaining great cultures that ultimately drive growth and performance. This year’s winning organizations are to be admired for the diverse and impactful ways they ensure culture underpins their success.”

For more information about the program, visit www.canadasmostadmired.com

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TransLink Mayors Council Meeting Brings Victory for Mayor McCallum

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In the first TransLink Mayors Council Meeting, mayors collectively voted to suspend the Surrey light rail transit and move forward with implementing a SkyTrain extension to Langley. Despite numerous unanswered questions and concerns in suspending the LRT, Surrey’s new mayor Doug McCallum spoke to the mayors about the impact the switch will make for Surrey.

As the meeting proceeded, he was victorious. Before the votes were counted a discussion between the mayors was made where multiple mayors questioned the suspension. Mayor McCallum disagreed with a statement that Richmond mayor Malcolm Brodie made during their discussion.

Mayor Brodie said that the decision behind the LRT was not made lightly in previous years considering Surrey residents, politicians and transportation experts were consulted. Mayor Brodie said the previous party, Surrey First, proposed the idea and had worked on the implementation of the line for years.

“I think this approach is going down a very dangerous precedent,” mayor Brodie said. Whether or not the plans should change based on an election was a question the mayors should think about before casting their vote, mayor Brodie said. Mayor Brodie requested that the board meet again to vote once the timeline and facts are more concrete. The next mayor’s council meeting will take place on Dec. 13 but mayor McCallum said, “The region is ready to move forward. We need to move forward.”

While mayor Brodie said majority of the Surrey residents prefer the LRT, mayor McCallum opposed Brodie’s statement and said that the only residents for the construction of the LRT were previous politicians and residents with a business background. He gave an example of two of the delegates that attended, Anita Huberman CEO of the Surrey Board of Trade and Dr. Greg Thomas President and CEO of G3 Consulting Ltd.

Huberman said during her speech that to build the LRT is to connect Surrey all around. “Let’s build it,” she said. Mayor McCallum said that his role is to be the voice for the people and said, “I believe in being a messenger for our city.”

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21sep12:00 pm1:00 pmPilates and Yoga for Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion: Free Webinar by Surrey Neuroplasticity Clinic12:00 pm - 1:00 pm Location: Free webinar by Surrey Neuroplasticity Clinic, 13737 96 Ave Suite 204, Surrey, BC V3V 0C6 Cost: FREE

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