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[REVIEW] 2014 Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid – An old name for a new way of thinking

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As a small boy, one of my favourite toys was a scale model of a Nissan Hardbody pickup truck. I carried that toy truck almost everywhere I went, keeping it in pristine condition. Even customizing it as it got older.

Using a fine tip silver pen, I strategically painted in the matte black plastic areas to simulate a chrome brushguard. I even added tiny luminescent strips to simulate the turn signals and lighting.

I scoured the pages of car brochures and magazines to find the right sized Nissan logos to simulate decals on my beloved toy truck. But not just any magazine would do. The paper stock had to be thick enough to match the longevity of the truck. This, ladies and gentlemen, was arts and crafts to me. Yup, my love/obsession with cars goes back that far.

Who knew that 27 years later in the making, my little pickup truck would lay see its claim to fame as the foreword in my review of the Nissan Pathfinder.

It’s almost like fate…like kismet.

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History

My first experience in a Nissan Pathfinder was around the age of 10. My classmate Stuart (Hi Stuart!) was picked up and dropped off from elementary school by his mom in a red Pathfinder.

On a school field trip day, I was assigned to his car as his mom chaperoned us to the UBC museum of Anthropology.

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Back in those days, the Nissan Pathfinder was based on the Nissan Hardbody pickup truck, just like my scale model toy. Over the next 2 generations, the Pathfinder would continue to be built this way, honing its reputation as a tough machine.

And as such, the previous generation Nissan Pathfinder was genuinely capable in the rough stuff. For the first time ever, its cabin even offered seven-seater versatility.

However, because it was still based on the Nissan Frontier, it rode and handled like the pickup truck that it shared its chassis with, and was outmatched by more civilized unibody-based competitors with their car-like handling and ride characteristics

Although the previous gen Pathfinder still garnered loyal fans, especially due to its ability to tow heavier loads as a result of its body-on-frame construction and available 5.6L V8, its rough and tumble nature didn’t win enough new fans, especially from those who were looking to buy an SUV for the school run.

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Traditional fans of the Pathfinder name may lament the death of the SUV as it used to be, but the sales numbers tell the story. In the past, Nissan used to sell two Pathfinders for every Xterra SUV. With this new 4th generation Pathfinder, they sell five for every Xterra sold.

Like it or not, Nissan is a business and in the words of our favourite Dragon (or Shark, depending on which show you watch), Kevin O’Leary, they have to “make moneeey”.

The Exterior Looks

Pathfinder three-quarter front

In a nutshell the 2014 model is attractive, has a dose of Nissan DNA (at least from the front), but is also now rather generic past the A-pillar.

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While I wouldn’t go so far as to say that the design is forgettable, unlike some of my fellow automobile journalists out there. But I will concede that it is pretty telling that Nissan has finally given into years of Consumer Reports’ complaining, and even done away with the trademark Pathfinder high mounted C-pillar rear door handles.

Consumer Reports has long groused about this quirky Pathfinder characteristic, saying that the high mounted door handles were out of reach for small children.

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And so this gives us a first indication as to what today’s Pathfinder is designed to be. A proper kid and family-friendly 7 passenger seating crossover SUV.

But all hope is not lost for traditionalists. If you want a mid-sized off-road capable SUV that you can take off-road, you can still go for the Nissan Xterra.

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With its chrome nose, the Pathfinder still looks somewhat brutish, truckish. I think it still gives buyers the tougher SUV, minivan-rejecting look that they’re looking for. Moving further further back though, the shape blends into a more generic rounded SUV tail-end.

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I think Nissan’s designers have done a good job here in keeping the Pathfinder looking more SUV and less minivanish. While the Hyundai Santa Fe XL, one of the Nissan’s main competitors, has a prettier nose, the Pathfinder has a better looking rump that will be sure to avoid any comparisons with the dreaded “v” word.

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Finished in a classy dark blue paint job (called Artic Blue Metallic) and attractive 20” two toned wheels, my top level Platinum Premium-trimmed Pathfinder was definitely still pleasing to the eyes.

But wait, there’s more! These little badges on the front doors and tailgate are a hint of something a bit more special, or at least more unique, with my test vehicle.

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Yup, for the first time ever, the Pathfinder is now available in hybrid form, entering a relatively empty space in the market place that is currently only occupied by the other non-luxury three-row hybrid crossover, the Toyota Highlander Hybrid.

Aside from the special badging, the hybrid Pathfinders are fitted with unique LED tail lamps that are unavailable on the purely petrol powered models. Otherwise, else is essentially the same. A good thing especially when we delve into the cabin.

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The Cabin

The Pathfinder’s interior won its way to the prestigious WardsAuto World 10 Best Interiors list for 2013 and it’s not difficult to see why. Inside there is a neatly trimmed interior. Everything is put together very nicely, in typical Nissan fashion. Functional, pleasant but a bit boring. The dashboard plastics are hard, so you’ll have to go to luxury branded Infiniti for soft-touch materials.

But at least the textures and grain look nice, match well, and seem like they’ll last decades. Even the plastic wood trim is decent.

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A large 8” touchscreen display is mounted high up for easy viewing. The Platinum Premium trim includes the Nissan Navigation System with NavTraffic real-time traffic information (via SiriusXM), streaming audio via Bluetooth, and a standard RearView monitor.

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The buttons are refreshingly simple with clear fonts and good sizing. I really liked the hard button controls for the climate and audio system. Much better than the half-baked unresponsive touchscreen nonsense from other cars.

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However that being said, I wish Nissan took a stand in some respects. For some information displays, you have to use a mix of the hard button and touchscreen controls and it can be slight confusing at times which is what.

With the Platinum you also get a class-exclusive AroundView Monitor system which gives the driver a virtual 360-degree image of the area around the vehicle. The system uses a front mounted camera (in the Nissan badge), two side mounted cameras integrated into each wing mirror, and a rear view camera under the tailgate latch.

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The result is a beautiful and useful top-down look at where you’re going, sort of like a video game. Parking is a snap especially where there are painted lines, as you can see exactly where you are positioned in the spot.

Kudos to Nissan for using a headunit with enough computing power to process the multiple video feeds simultaneously, and also for using high quality cameras with decent low light sensitivity. During my test week with the Pathfinder, I was also testing a $125K 2014 Range Rover Supercharged.

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The Range Rover’s cameras and headunit were nowhere as good as the Pathfinder’s, with disappointingly grainy images in low light and laggy live video footage when there was more than one video feed being displayed onscreen. Great job Nissan!

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Other standard technology on the Platinum Premium includes heated and cooled front seats, heated 2nd row seats, and even a heated steering wheel! Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control, Bluetooth® Hands-free Phone System, and a power rear liftgate are standard on this trim level.

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Also fitted to my test Pathfinder was iPod integration and tri-zone entertainment system with 2nd row head restraint-mounted DVD display screens and RCA inputs.

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In an era where even kids have iPads, I was ready to write off the head restraint-mounted DVD displays. However after spending some time using them, I have to say that I really liked them for their optimal positioning and their image quality. With the Pathfinder’s adjustable 2nd row seats (for both legroom and seatback angle), the rear cabin experience reminded me of a business class seat in a commercial airline.

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And so the well packaged interior means that there is loads of storage space and getting in and out is a snap with the low door sills. No running boards or sidesteps needed here.

It’s not even bad getting into the 3rd row seat, where there is ample room for two smaller adults. A unique feature of the 2nd row sliding seat is that you can move it forward without removing a child seat that is installed in it.

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The huge panoramic moonroof, standard on this Platinum Premium Pathfinder, while not as large as the Hyundai Santa Fe XL’s, is positioned further back and really does help to open up the space and eliminate any claustrophobia. A power sliding sunshade blocks out the light when it’s too sunny or hot.

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With all these features in play, it’s easy to see that the Pathfinder is going after a different audience and doing a great job at it.

Hybrid Technology

For the Hybrid Pathfinder, the well renowned Nissan 3.5L V6 engine is replaced by a new supercharged 2.5-litre gasoline engine and an electric motor paired with a compact Lithium-ion battery. The 15 kW (20hp) electric motor and gas engine work in tandem to provide performance similar to the conventional Pathfinder.

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The system is rated at 250 net horsepower and 243 lb-ft of torque – versus the 3.5-litre V6’s 260 horsepower and 240 lb-ft of torque.

The hybrid system also uses a Nissan Intelligent Dual Clutch System (one motor / two clutch parallel system) that efficiently manages power from both the electric motor and the gas engine.

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Positioned between the gasoline engine and the next-gen Xtronic CVT transmission (where the torque converter would normally be), the motor also functions as a generator, conveying energy from the CVT to the battery upon deceleration. One clutch is installed between the gasoline engine and the electric motor, the other between the motor and the CVT.

In order to preserve the Pathfinder’s unique 2nd row sliding functionality and easy access to the 3rd row, engineers cleverly positioned the space-saving Lithium Ion battery under the 3rd row seat. The result is no loss in passenger or cargo room at all.

The hybrid’s 2nd and 3rd row seats still fold completely flat. Very impressive as other hybrids I’ve tested have had significantly compromised cargo room.

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A regenerative braking system automatically recharges the battery by converting the vehicle’s kinetic energy that would be otherwise lost in braking.

The downside of packaging a small battery and motor is that Pathfinder rarely runs in pure EV mode. I only experienced the EV mode when coasting downhill, or when waiting in traffic with the air conditioning off (as the compressor is otherwise powered by the gas engine).

Fuel economy is officially rated at 7.4L/100km combined, an improvement of 22 percent over the standard Pathfinder. With the Pathfinder Hybrid’s large 73-litre fuel tank, the same as 3.5-litre V6 models, driving range (highway) is more than 1,000kms. I averaged about 11.2L/100 kms in mixed city/highway driving.

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Putting it all together…how does it drive?

By switching from a body-on-frame to a unibody design, the Nissan engineers saved about 300-500lbs of weight. This pays dividends as the power from the hybrid drivetrain is good but not mindblowing. The CVT dulls the overall responsiveness and unless you stab the accelerator pedal, the power delivery is smooth but won’t pin you into your seat.

The sensation from a dead stop is also a bit weird because you can feel and hear the clutch “slipping” as it balances between battery and traditional engine power. It almost sounds a bit like a manual transmission car. A new experience for me in an SUV.

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At full throttle, due to the CVT holding the engine revs, the supercharger makes its presence noticeable with a characteristic whine. It’s not unpleasant but unexpected. The supercharger whine is also particularly noticeable when engine braking downhill in the manually selected low gear.

But like all Pathfinders, the hybrid version still offers an otherwise quiet, comfortable ride. Handling is provided by an independent strut front/multi-link rear suspension combined with an electrohydraulic power-assisted steering.

Handling, while acceptable, is nothing groundbreaking. Due to the soft springs, there is a fair amount of body roll when pushed, along with slow weight transfer motions. But this is not to say that the ride is at all wallowy because it isn’t. It’s just comfortable but not sporty.

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As for the steering, it’s efficient but not sporty either. I didn’t find it to be as vague on centre as I had read in other road test reviews, however I did find it numb and the weighting rather artificial. It’s not particularly quick either, unlike the Mazda CX-9. But honestly speaking, will buyers notice it? Probably not. Nor would they care.

With an available intuitive all-wheel drive system, Pathfinder continues to serve as an excellent vehicle for inclement weather driving conditions.

It’s the only vehicle in its class with selectable 2WD (front wheel drive), Auto or 4WD Lock modes for its “ALL-MODE 4×4-I” system. The system lets the driver choose full-time 2WD for maximum fuel economy, Auto mode to automatically monitor conditions and adjust the balance of power between front and rear wheels for best traction, or 4WD Lock mode when the confidence of full-time AWD is desired (with a 50% front/50% rear torque lock). In addition, standard Hill Start Assist helps add control when starting and driving away on a steep incline.

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I left the system in Auto mode 98% of the time. The other 2% of the time I tested the 2WD mode or 4WD Lock. I didn’t like the 2WD mode mainly because the front wheels would easily spin due to the torque from the electric motor plus the less than impressive Toyo winter tires (which I also complained about in the Mazda CX-9).

There is a nifty display in the 4.2” LCD screen between the speedometer and tachometer that can be configured not only to show hybrid power mode, but also to show the live torque distribution between the front and rear wheels.

In Auto mode, most of the time 90% of the power is going to the front wheels upon acceleration. When you’re up to speed, the system gradually tapers to 100% front wheel drive anyway.I really liked that the system was dynamic enough to actively transfer power to the rear wheels to prevent front wheel slippage before it occurred. A far more intelligent system than a purely part-time all wheel drive reactive system.

According to Nissan, with the exception of what’s under the hood and the lower tow rating, the Pathfinder hybrid is pretty much the same as the gas-powered Pathfinder.

Hybrid-equipped Pathfinders retain the ability to tow boats, ATVs, trailers and a variety of other recreational gear up to 3,500 pounds (1,588kg) when properly equipped.

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Final Thoughts

To be competitive these days, a car company needs a car-based 3 row SUV. The segment has really shifted from the demands of a body-on-frame design to a unibody construction which is focused more on fuel economy, passenger comfort, and the safety and security of all-wheel-drive to get to the campground (but not necessarily past it).

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When Nissan last designed the Pathfinder they went the truck based route when many of the top sellers were based on car based platforms. Oops.

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There are a few things you give up. It’s no hard-core off-roader, but with enough ground clearance, it’s certainly enough to go off onto a dirt road to a camp site. With a 5000lbs towing capacity (for the non-hybrid version), this is down on the previous generation Pathfinder but more than enough for most buyers.

But more buyers are going to enjoy what they gained rather than what they lose with this latest Pathfinder.

This new car-based platform (shared with the Nissan Murano) means that this 4th generation Pathfinder rides better, handles better, and is more economical on fuel than before. It drives a lot like a jacked up Altima sedan.

So while it’s no longer just a rough and ready SUV based on a pickup truck like my toy, it’s certainly better suited to today’s families. And these families have indeed been flocking to the Nissan dealerships to check out this strong contender in the competitive crossover market. Guess what? So should you.

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2014 Nissan Pathfinder Platinum Price Sheet

 

Andrew is a proud car and tech geek who has worked in Surrey for over the last 10 years. He comes from a communications/marketing background and has worked for automotive-related companies such as Edmunds.com, BenzWorld.org since 1999. From track driving, to rally driving to autocross, he has done it all. When he’s not reading or writing about the latest automotive news, he can be found outdoors snapping pictures at various events around town. You can contact him at Andrew (at) surrey604.com

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[REVIEW] 2022 Volvo V90 Cross Country B6 AWD wagon

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Can you believe that Volvo’s “Cross Country” badge is now more than 20 years old? While we’ve got to hand it to AMC’s Eagle 4×4 wagon and the Subaru Outback for inventing the jacked-up wagon design, Volvo can arguably also be considered one of the pioneers of the format.

Although Volvo sells its V60 wagon in both regular and Cross Country trim levels, in Canada, the larger and more upscale V90 can only be had in rugged Cross Country form.

Sitting at the top of Volvo’s “V” wagon range, the V90 doesn’t mess too much with a formula which has worked for the brand (and others) for over two decades now. With a raised ride height, all-wheel-drive, and rugged body cladding, the 2022 Volvo V90 B6 AWD Cross Country is a direct competitor with the only other almost full-sized off-road-y wagon in its class, the Mercedes-Benz E450 All-Terrain wagon.

No doubt both the big Benz and the big Volvo are designed with the same points in mind. That is to create a neat compromise between a family car while yet being stylish, practical, and with the ability to take on a light trail without so much as breaking a sweat.

But will the Volvo stand out over and above its competition? Let’s take a closer look.

On the inside

Volvo’s XC90 SUV has won many awards globally since its introduction. Spec-for-spec, the V90 Cross Country is cheaper to buy than the equivalent XC90, though it lacks a third row.

Step into the V90 Cross Country’s roomy interior and you’ll find a gorgeous crisply tailored cabin designed in a simplistic and minimalist Scandinavian fashion. The silver Bowers & Wilkins speaker grilles add some premium highlights to the otherwise dark interior.

Every surface is essentially soft-touch, fine-grained wood, or satin metal accents. The knurled starter knob adds some delightful tactile feel to the interior and there are other small easter eggs such as the tiny Swedish flag sewn into the front passenger seatback seam. “Since 1959” is stamped into the seatbelt buckle, a nod towards the year in which Volvo introduced seatbelts.

Volvo has a long-held reputation for excellent seats and the V90 Cross Country does not disappoint. With multiple adjustments, a great deal of width, good padding, the front seat cushions provided excellent support for long drives. Based on previous experience, a broad range of body types should fit.

Surprisingly, I found access to the rear seats a bit more difficult than the Mercedes-Benz E450 All-Terrain wagon. Due to the Volvo’s rear door openings being relatively short, the footpath into the back seat is fairly narrow. The door sills are also quite high, presumably due to crash protection, so there may be a bit of fancy footwork required for taller passengers.

Thankfully, the V90 Cross Country’s taller ride height makes it easier to exit and egress than the lower S90 sedan that the wagon is based on.

How does it ride and drive?

Under the hood of the 2022 V90 Cross Country B6 wagon is the latest variant of Volvo’s 2.0-litre direct-injected supercharged and turbocharged four-cylinder engine. Unlike the previous 316 horsepower T6 setup which incorporated a turbocharger and a mechanically driven supercharger, the B6 powerplant produces 295 horsepower and 310 lb-ft of torque from its combination of turbocharging, electrically driven supercharging, and a 48-volt mild hybrid system.

Although the system produces less power than before, the mild-hybrid system ensures no lag at all upon throttle pedal application. Engine restarts from the start-stop system are also extremely smooth, much more so than before. This complex arrangement of forced induction, combined by the 8-speed transmission, delivered grunt in a much smoother and refined manner compared to the T6 powerplant.

Like other Volvos, the V90 Cross Country AWD uses a BorgWarner/Haldex-based all-wheel-drive system. A special “Off-Road” mode (similar to Mercedes’ “All Terrain” mode) lightens the steering and activates a low speed algorithm designed to enhance engine braking. Volvo says that this ensures better traction in slippery conditions.

Ride-wise, the V90 Cross Country’s combination of chunky tires and 2.37 inches of extra suspension travel aids in it absorbing big bumps extremely well. Ruts and potholes are handled with ease and the wagon is likely to be more capable than most owners would ever need it to be. There is a bit more pitch and wallow in sharp corners, but that’s likely to be less of a concern for buyers of this class of vehicle.

While the V90 is a competent cruiser, its chassis doesn’t offer quite the same level of agility, composure, or handling compared to the air sprung 2022 Mercedes-Benz E450 All-Terrain wagon that I recently tested.

Technology updates

Volvo was one of the first to incorporate a Tesla-like iPad sized portrait orientated infotainment touchscreen into their cars. After several years of trying to refine their Sensus infotainment system, they’ve decided to partner with Google in using the Android Automotive Operating System.

While much faster than the Sensus interface, I can’t help but feel that the Android Automotive interface is too simplistic now, lacking many of the shortcuts and graphical textures that made the Sensus system feel premium. My test vehicle’s system did not have Apple Carplay integration, though Volvo Canada says that this will be released in a future update. Alas, the fantastic knurled drive mode selector scroll wheel has also been eliminated.

All Volvo V90 Cross Country wagons come with a digital instrument display which is clear and easy to read. However, unless you’ve had the benefit of playing around with Volvo’s system in-depth, the user interface is slightly confusing to navigate at first blush. Most cars with digital instrument panels these days are also far more flexible and user-configurable than Volvo’s, which almost seems basic in comparison.

Fortunately, the optionally available heads-up display is useful and effective at displaying speed and other information relevant to the driver.

As Volvo has a deep-rooted reputation for making safe cars, it’s no surprise that the V90’s sedan sibling, the Volvo S90, was awarded with an IIHS Top Safety Pick+.

Part of the reason for this top-grade rating was not just the expected safety suite of forward collision warning, lane departure warning and low and high-speed emergency braking. Volvo also includes run-off-road protection, which pretensions seatbelts to hold occupants in place if the car rolls over, and deformable seats that minimise spinal injuries in the event of a serious crash. Blindspot warning, adaptive cruise control, and rear cross traffic alert are also standard equipment.

Another simple but effective system is Volvo’s rear seat belt reminder. It displays a graphic depicting everyone’s seating position and buckle status. If a belted rear passenger decides to unbuckle while the car is in motion, the graphic re-appears along with a persistent audible alert until re-buckling occurs.

Final thoughts

Comfortable, quiet, well-dampened, capable, safe. These are the five words in which I’d use to describe the 2022 Volvo V90 Cross Country B6 AWD wagon in a pinch.

With the new and relaxed B6 powerplant, a high quality interior, and well-suppressed wind noise, the V90 Cross Country is a very pleasant way of eating up long distances and a great alternative to the ubiquitous luxury SUV.

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[REVIEW] 2022 Mercedes-Benz E450 4Matic All-Terrain wagon

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Ever since Crocodile Dundee introduced the Subaru Outback wagon, many have come to accept the lifted wagon body style as a smart alternative to an SUV. With the Outback wagon having a long-running reputation, other manufacturers have borrowed from the proven formula over the years.

Audi was one of the first to jump in, with their A6 Allroad introduced over 20 years ago, as was Volvo with their “Cross Country” wagons. And now, Mercedes-Benz is the latest manufacturer to jump in, albeit late to the party, with their latest E-class wagon.

In order to make the E-class wagon a bit more rough and ready and less wagon-y, the boffins at Benz have taken the latest 2022 E450 wagon and dubbed it the E450 All-Terrain. Presumably this name will attract those looking for an upmarket Subaru Outback, and as an alternative to the the smaller Audi Allroad which is based on the compact A4 platform versus the mid-sized A6 platform of the original 1999 Audi Allroad.

How is it different?

Although station wagons were found on many a suburban driveway in the 1970 to 90’s, punters decided that they were sort of lame when the SUV came out.

These days, the more off-road-y wagons are making a strong comeback, and given that my parents’ family car when growing up was a Mercedes-Benz 300TE wagon, I have a special place in my heart for any sort of Mercedes-Benz wagon.

Aside from the Mercedes-AMG E63 wagon, the E450 All-Terrain is the only way that wagon fans can satisfy their wagon-needs in Canada. There is no “standard” version of the wagon sold any longer.

The addition of the 2022 Mercedes-Benz E450 All-Terrain wagon comes alongside a refresh to the company’s entire E-class line-up. While mostly cosmetic, the requisite nips and tucks to the bumpers, headlights, taillights have been made. Inside, the infotainment system has been revised with the latest version of the MBUX system, but the rest has mostly been left alone.

In order to match the SUV-cues, All-Terrain wagons come standard with plastic fender flares and additional body cladding. There is also a signature All-Terrain front grille and a chromed skid plate. My test vehicle was fitted with the standard 19-inch wheels, but larger 20-inchers are optional extras.

Ground clearance is also greater, with the E450 All-Terrain sitting 1.2 inches higher thanks to Mercedes Airmatic air springs all-around. The system can raise slightly for additional ground clearance at lower speeds.

Under the hood, gone is the twin-turbo V6, replaced with a turbocharged 3.0-litre inline-six cylinder paired with a 48-volt mild hybrid system, similar to that in the GLE450 SUV. Although the output of 362 horsepower and 369 lbs-ft of torque matches that of the outgoing V6, the starter-generator mild-hybrid system can add another 21 horses. This system is dubbed “EQ Boost”.

Mercedes says that their EQ Boost technology helps to electrify vehicles intelligently and cost-effectively by increasing the performance and efficiency of a conventional internal combustion engine without the complexity and expense of a full-hybrid system.

On the inside

At 4.95 metres in length, the Mercedes E450 All-Terrain wagon’s most natural competitor is the Volvo V90 Cross Country wagon. Both are nearly full-sized, and both have interiors that drip in luxury finishings and technology that are befitting of their over $80,000 base prices. Audi’s All-Road wagon and the Subaru Outback are comparably cheaper but also smaller.

The E-Class wagon’s boxy styling allows for a party trick which is all but a rarity in today’s cars. Look under the E450 All-Terrain’s cargo floor and you’ll find a pair of foldaway rear-facing jump seats. Given that there is a large cargo area – 64 cu.ft when the rear seats are folded, or 35 cu ft with the rear seats up – there is just enough room to make the rear facing jump seats work.

Indeed, I have fond memories of riding in my parents’ wagon in said jump seats, though a quick seat (or attempt to) fit in the cargo area quickly reminded me that I was no longer an 11 year old. My 5 year old nephew, on the other hand, loved the novelty of facing backwards even though the vehicle was stationary. Clearly these seats are for children only, and or very small adults.

Mercedes has cleverly fitted these seats with head restraints (which stow away under the floor) and three point seatbelts as well.

The rest of the E450 All-Terrain was standard Mercedes-Benz corporate fare, which is to say that it all feels right. The optional leather or MB-Tex leatherette seats are the typical Mercedes-Benz standard of supportive, comfortable, and firm enough for cross-country hauls. As expected, they can be heated and or ventilated depending on the boxes that you check-off on the options list.

Open-pore wood trim is standard equipment, as is the 64 colour ambient light system with a seemingly umteen amount of colour themes. You can even select them to illuminate various areas in different colours or have the system cycle through the themes dynamically.

How does it ride and drive?

If you can’t stomach the me-too trend of going for an SUV, the E-class All-Terrain mixes enough wagon and SUV quality to produce a compromise that is worth having.

The wagon’s inherent lower centre-of-gravity, simply because it’s based on a car platform, simply means that the E450 All-Terrain feels more planted around the twisties versus something like a Mercedes-Benz GLC or GLE SUV.

Mercedes-Benz has succeeded if intends for the changes to the E-class wagon to appeal to someone who is looking for the ability to do some light off-roading while being sportier than an SUV. Yet, the All-Terrain is as comfortable and relaxing after a four-hour stint behind the wheel compared to a standard E-class sedan.

On my favourite backroads, the E-class’ fundamentally well-sorted out chassis shines through despite the increase in ride height. Little has been done to spoil the base car’s balance.

In Comfort mode, there is more rolling into corners but it’s far from cumbersome. Part of the trade-off is also in slightly more aggressive tires with taller sidewalls. If the going gets more ribbon-like, Sport mode seems to tighten everything up by the appropriate amount, with the right amount of dampening and a bearable ride.

Sport mode also sharpens the throttle pedal response, heavies up the steering feel, and holds the engine revs a bit longer. The EQ Boost system also seems to step in a bit more aggressively.

Another part of the reason for the All-Terrain’s surefootedness is Mercedes-Benz’s permanent 4Matic all-wheel-drive system. The system is rear-biased front-to-rear torque split of 31:69. A new five-mode Dynamic Select system adds a new All-Terrain setting not found on other E-classes.

Mercedes says that selecting this mode increases the ride height by a further 0.78 inches at speeds up to 30 km/hr, and also optimises the stability and traction control systems for lower-grip surfaces.

Final thoughts

While the 2022 Mercedes-Benz E450 All-Terrain wagon is unlikely to be called “fun”, it did everything that I asked of it.

From hauling passengers in style, comfort, and luxury, this 5+2 passenger vehicle is a compelling and yet often forgotten rival to Mercedes’ own GLE, as well as other SUVs in the market.

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[REVIEW] 2022 Honda Civic Touring sedan

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While you might think that lower production luxury cars cost more to engineer than mass production compact cars, the opposite is reality. For example, the 10th generation Civic was said to have cost Honda more money, time and effort than other new models in their history.

And yet, while starting from a clean slate is never easy or inexpensive, we’re now in the 11th generation of the Honda Civic. A lot has changed since the first Civic went on sale in North America in the early 1970’s for under $3,000. However, Honda is still offering the Civic as both a sedan and a hatchback.

The Civic is Honda’s longest-running automotive nameplate, with more than 2.25 million cars sold in Canada since it was introduced here in 1973. Moreover, the Civic has been built at Honda of Canada Mfg facility in Allison, Ontario continuously since 1988. This is longer than any other Honda plant in the world currently producing the model.

Each generation of Civic has been more grown up than the previous, and this 11th generation car carries on the tradition by offering a more subdued appearance akin to its big brother Accord.

What’s new?

Although the previous generation Civic was offered as a coupe, this longer is the case due to declining sales of that variant. The 11th generation Civic is all-new, with a redesigned body. It is now only offered in North America as a four door hatchback (which we will review in a future article), as well as the sedan as tested in this review.

While the Civic is still considered technically considered a compact sedan, this latest version is larger, more substantial, and more upscale than its predecessors.

It’s not difficult to see why then, despite the SUV/crossover craze, the Honda Civic is still at the top of the Canadian passenger car sales segment. 43,556 units of this all-new 11th generation Civics were sold in 2021, allowing it to maintain the number one position as Canada’s best-selling car for the 24th consecutive year.

Aside from the more Accord-esque styling queues, Honda has improved the ride and handling, with the interior featuring the requisite new features, nicer materials, and new technology.
Despite compact car competitors, such as the Mazda 3, offering all-wheel-drive on their line-up, Honda insists that the Civic will continue to be front-wheel drive only.

It’s all grown-up

Honda says that the 2022 Civic Sedan is “a modern expression of classic Civic values, inside and out”. Built using what Honda describes as their “Man Maximum / Machine minimum Philosophy” (aka M/M), the design concept is supposed to use technology and design to serve the needs of the occupants.

What this marketing jargon translates into is a “thin and light” body design with a low hood, front fenders, and a low horizontal beltline. Your eyes aren’t tricking you if you think that the Civic appears bigger.

This is due to the bottom of the windshield pillars being moved rearward by 50mm, elongating the hood and stretching the Civic’s silhouette compared to the previous generation car.

Behind the new front bumper skin is a new bumper beam safety plate that has been designed to decrease leg injuries. The longer hood also has an embossed inner structure designed to improve pedestrian head protection performance.

Honda says that the new lower character line that rises through the rear doors is supposed to provide for an enhanced sense of motion. I’m not so sure if it is as exciting as the marketing-speak describes, but the car does look good regardless, even though it is slightly derivative of the Accord’s styling (not a bad thing to imitate).

The new Civic’s wider rear track is emphasised by stronger rear haunches, wider LED taillamps, and an aerodynamically efficient trailing edge of the trunk lid.

Speaking of LED lighting, Honda has used it extensively for the headlamps, daytime running lamps, parking lights, and fog lights. The new LED headlamps are excellent, casting a wide and white beam which is effective in lighting up the road ahead even in inclement weather.

Back to basics on the inside

Inside, gone are the days of the multi-level dashboards and cubbies from Civics in the past. You’ll find an uncluttered cabin design heralding back from the days of the very early-generation Civics.

Nowhere better can you see this change than in the top of the Civic’s instrument panel which has been redesigned with minimum cutlines to reduce both visual distraction sand windshield reflections. In my eyes, this is a welcome improvement that fits in well with the premium new exterior design.

Remember the windshield A-pillars that have been moved back by 50 mm? That change, combined with the low hood, flat dashboard, and tucked away windshield wipers, has improved forward visibility with more clearly defined corners. It’s easier to place the Civic’s edges than ever before during parking situations. The low cowl height is matched with the door’s sills and carries through to the rear doors.

Perhaps the most striking interior element is the new metal honeycomb mesh accent that stretches from door to door and across the dash. This accent clever hides the air vents while still creating a dramatic visual separation between the infotainment system and climate controls.

The metal-look HVAC controls feel high-quality. Overall, all of the switchgear has a distinctly more expensive feel to it. Honda says that they’ve even paid attention to smallest details, such as a new premium centre control trim that is specifically designed to hide fingerprints and smudges to help maintain a high-end appearance.

For anyone that has suffered through the scratches in the piano black plastic trim of vehicles in the same class, this subtle but significant innovation will certainly be welcome.

All Civics also benefit from a new generation seat design, with a new frame designed to enhance comfort on long drives.

Technology

My top-of-the-range 2022 Civic Touring sedan debuts with Honda’s all-new 9-inch high definition touchscreen infotainment system. This new touchscreen is the largest ever in any Honda vehicle, and the system supports both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

While it has taken Honda several tries to get the touchscreen right, I’m happy to say that they’ve nailed this one out of the park with the combination of touchscreen, soft buttons, and hard button controls.

The Civic now builds upon the foundation laid by the Display audio system in other Honda models such as the Odyssey, Pilot, Passport, and Accord.

The physical volume knob, simplified user-interface design, and cleanly designed icons make the system easy-to-use even for those new to the Civic. I particularly appreciated the effort that has been made to simplify the system’s navigational structure with fewer menus. The hard buttons for Home and Back functions were nice to have when toggling through the menu screens when wearing gloves.

Standard on my Touring-trim model is also the first use of Bose audio in a Civic, with Bose Centrepoint 2 and Bose SurroundStage digital signal processing.

On the safety front, this latest generation Civic earned a U.S. IIHS Top Safety Pick + Rating. This is in part thanks to all 2022 Civic trims receiving new frontal airbags designed to better control head motions in certain types of crash, thereby better reducing conditions associated with brain injury.

The driver’s airbag uses a new donut-shaped structure to cradle and hold the head to reduce rotation, and the passenger front airbag uses a innovative new three-chamber design to achieve a similar result.

The standard Honda Sensing suite of active driver-aids include a new single-camera system which is capable of more quickly and accurately identifying pedestrians, cyclists, and other vehicles.

My 2022 Honda Civic Touring tester was also further enhanced with expanded driver-assistive tech, including features normally found in premium brands.

In addition to the now ubiquitous automatic emergency braking, forward collision warning, and lane keeping assist, there is also a Traffic Jam Assist feature. I noticed that the Adaptive Cruise Control system has also been improved with more natural brake applications and quicker response times.

The Civic, for the first time, now features Low-Speed Braking Control, and front and rear false-start prevention.

So, how does it drive?

There are two engine choices available for the 2022 Honda Civic: a turbocharged 1.5-litre four-cylinder (as equipped on my Touring test car) and a naturally aspirated 2.0-litre four-cylinder. Both engines have outputs of 180 horsepower and 158 horsepower respectively. Torque figures are 177 lb-ft at 1,700 to 4,500 rpm, and 138 ft-lb at 4,200 rpms respectively.

I found the turbocharged engine more than adequate for its class, with strong initial acceleration off the line. The wide torque band was appreciated in passing maneuvers regardless of speed. I’d suspect that the naturally aspirated 2.0-litre wouldn’t be quite as flexible.

Both engines are paired with Honda’s latest CVT transmission, uniquely tuned for each engine. The CVT paired with the turbocharged engine has improved torque converter performance and Step-Shift programming which does a pretty darn good job at simulating actual gears. This eliminates much of the rubberbanding sensation commonly found in conventional CVTs.

In addition to the standard Normal and Eco driving modes, 2.0L Sport and 1.5L Touring trims of the 2022 Civics now feature a user-selectable Sport mode. Using a toggle switch on the centre console, the new Sport mode alters the drive ratios and mapping for a sportier feel and changes the meter lighting to red. Eco mode reduces throttle and transmission sensitivity, as well as air conditioning output to help preserve fuel efficiency.

Handling is nimble, with little body roll and quick steering.The Civic felt capable, secure, and sporty for a compact car. No doubt this is thanks to a stiffer body structure and the additional 35 mm of wheelbase versus the previous-gen Civic.

Road noise, a former complaint of other Civics, was nicely muted even at highway speeds. But one caveat is that my top Touring trim had added sound insulation. Reviews from other auto journalists have stated that lower-trim Civics could also benefit from this added insulation, so be sure to test drive different trim levels.

If you’re looking for more performance and better handling, you’ll have to step-up for the Civic Si model, which once again represents the sportiest Civic in the range till high performance Civic R makes its debut. The Si is only available with a six-speed manual transmission and a 200 horsepower turbocharged engine.

Final thoughts

35 years later and with nearly 11 million units produced in North America (5.3 million of which have been in Canada), the 11th generation Civic appears poised to continue its success with Canadians looking for a reliable compact car.

Later this year, the all-new Honda Civic Type R will be officially unveiled. This highly anticipated model will be the best performing Type R ever, capping the current 11th generation Honda Civic model line-up.

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[REVIEW] 2022 Mercedes-Benz S580 4Matic

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For decades, people at the very top – be they CEOs of international companies, presidents of nations, or royalty – travel in Mercedes-Benz S-classes. Often dubbed the “best car in the world”, Mercedes-Benz has long since launched their latest in luxury, technology, and design on this model, their flagship product.

And now, there is a new one. When I say new, I really do mean new in every respect. After all, the 2022 Mercedes-Benz S-class is supposed to represent the pinnacle of the Mercedes-Benz brand.

As expected, there is the requisite new body, new engine, new suspension, new interior heights of luxury, and the latest technology.

Mercedes-Benz continues to expand the S-class range to include Mercedes-AMG models and now also even more luxurious Mercedes-Maybach models.

For this review, we’ll be sampling the mid-level version of the personal limo for the ultra-wealthy, the 2022 Mercedes-Benz S580 4Matic.

Have the very best of Mercedes’ engineers, designers, and craftspersons created another technological tour-de-force? Let’s take a closer look.

What’s new

Now in its seven-generation, this all-new S-class can still be regarded as the iconic flagship of the brand. That being said, after almost half a century of existence, the lines have blurred a little whole lot in the luxury marketplace, including the shift to electric vehicles and consumers still favouring SUVs.

It’s no surprise then that there is a Mercedes-Maybach version of the GLS SUV, with the “S” part of the nomenclature added on purposely to draw upon the association with the success and status from the S-class.

While we live in confusing times these days, the S-class is still supposed to be the company’s most important brand exercise and the epitome of the company’s latest tagline of “The Best or Nothing”. With electric vehicles now manded by many countries within the next decade, we’re at the cusp of a changeover for both the auto industry and the consumer. Mercedes themselves have launched the “EQS580”, once again borrowing on the “S” nomenclature. Yet, both models exist simultaneously, for now anyway.

The 2022 S580 is a good example of this leading edge of the wave towards electrification of traditional ICE vehicles. Look no further than its impressive 48 volt mild-hybrid Mercedes EQ Boost technology, unbelievably opulent creature comforts (along with eye watering option list prices), and an impressive array of electronic and infotainment technology. This includes 3D OLED displays to facial recognition technology to a GPS navigation system with augmented reality.

While V8 engines seem to be on their way out, Mercedes-Benz has managed to keep one under the hood of the S580 in the form of a 4.0-litre 496 horsepower twin-turbo V8.

Like every S-class of recent vintage, every model rides on the Airmatic air suspension system. Optionally available is the E-Active Body Control system, which has a “curve” function that leans the cars into corners so as to reduce the centrifugal forces of going around a corner. For the first time ever, there is also a rear-wheel steering system that helps the big Benz to maneuver easily in tight spaces.

Interior: Comfort and Technology

The 2022 Mercedes-Benz S-class introduces a whole new corporate dash design, which we have already seen replicated in the all-new 2023 C-class and the upcoming GLC-class.

Gone is the wide central touchscreen, replaced by an even more massive centre touchscreen with an aspect ratio that is more squarish than it is rectangular. A 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster is fitted in front of the driver, but alas my test vehicle S580 wasn’t equipped with the 3D OLED screen nor the enhanced oversized heads-up display which is said to show navigation directions, via moving arrows, in augmented reality.

Wherever you look you’ll find multi-coloured and control responsive ambient lighting, leather, wood, chrome, satin metal finishes, and screens screens screens. Even if you don’t opt for the rear system, as with my S580 test vehicle, there is a rear centre console mounted Android tablet which can be used to control various functions for the rear seating area.

To make it easier to buckle your seatbelts at night, the seatbelt anchors are even lit. Opt for the optional executive rear seating package and the rear anchor point will also motorise up to make it easier for the buckle to be inserted into the slot. You won’t think you’ll need it till you use it for the first time!

Naturally, both front and rear seats are heated (and ventilated), as are the steering wheel and armrests. There are more intricate massage programs versus the model’s predecessor, for, both front and rear. Even the headrests can be spec’ed out with special pillows, rivalling the comfortable beds pillows you’ll find at high end hotels.

As you would expect, the 2022 Mercedes-Benz S580 is equipped with every advanced safety feature and then some. There is the usual cocoon of airbags that one would expect, but also airbags mounted in the front seatbacks for the rear passengers, and one mounted in the centre between the driver and front passenger. This new centre airbag is designed to deploy in a severe side impact, reducing the risk of front occupants cracking heads.

Moreover, aside from forward collision warning and mitigation, blindspot warning, lane departure warning, the latter two systems can also provide corrective action if so desired. The blindspot warning system even ties into the vehicle’s door locks, warning about a vehicle or bicycle passing should someone attempt to open the door into the path of either.

Ride and handling

My 2022 Mercedes-Benz S580 4Matic test vehicle was equipped with the latest system dubbed E-Active Body Control. Falling under the company’s “Innovation by Intelligence” umbrella, the system uses the 48-volt architecture and a network of over 20 sensors, five computer processors, and a stereo camera system to corroborate inputs at 1,000 times per second.

The Road Surface Scan system uses the stereo camera to proactively look at the road ahead, detecting changes in the road as small as two millimetres. This allows the system to predictively adjust the suspension ahead of time, readying it for a bump that is coming versus reacting to one that has already occurred. The feeling is a bit uncanny as ride motion over speed bumps are significantly muted by almost 80 per cent.

The same E-Active Body Control system has a safety party trick called “Impulse Side”. When tied into the side-mounted radar sensors, the system has the ability to recognise a potential side impact and raise the vehicle by 3.14 inches (80 mm) in just tenths of a second. As the side rocker panel sill is the strongest part of the car, there is potentially less intrusion into the passenger safety cell in the event of a side impact.

Despite the S580 being a massive car, the chauffeur doesn’t have to have all the fun. It feels surprisingly sporty, even in non-AMG form, and handles incredibly well in-spite of its size. Quick steering and good steering feel inspires confidence, even without the optional rear steering system, and S580’s permanent 4matic all-wheel-drive system worked flawlessly in poor weather conditions including during heavy snowfall.

The twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 engine and Mercedes’ 9-Gtronic automatic transmission are an incredibly well-matched pair, able to deliver both strong, push-you-into-the-seatback acceleration or graceful slow-speed departures with little fuss and few hiccups. Acceleration comes on quickly with a mere dip into the throttle pedal.

Final thoughts

It’s difficult to be disappointed whether you’re riding in the 2022 Mercedes-Benz S580 as a driver or a passenger. There is a reason why you still see leaders arriving in S-classes and significantly less so in competitors’ vehicles of the same class and size.

While its days as an executive limo, at least in its traditional form, may be numbered thanks to Mercedes’ EQ-line-up of fully electric vehicles, I doubt that Mercedes-Benz will retire the legendary “S-class” name badge anytime soon.

No doubt the S-class will continue to live on as the best car in the world, in any way, shape or form.

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[REVIEW] 2022 Mercedes-AMG E53 4MATIC coupe

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Mercedes-Benz has had a long history with B-pillarless coupe. Starting from the 1968 Stoker/8 Coupe with its frameless and fully retractable side windows, the B-pillarless design was intended to create a generous and less restricted overall appearance. In 1992, AMG got involved in tweaking what was then known as the W124 300CE E-Class-based coupe.

If we look back at the timeline, from a 51 percent takeover in 1998, the influence of Mercedes-Benz continued to grow until AMG became a wholly owned subsidiary of Mercedes-Benz in 2005.

Although today AMG is known to the vast majority of younger car fans as the Mercedes-Benz sports department, the fact that this company from Affalterbach was once an independent tuning company has been almost forgotten in many places. Officially, the present day name of the division is now “Mercedes-AMG”.

Before the cooperation agreement came into force, AMG took a 300CE (E-Class coupe) and fettled it with their specially tuned 6.0-litre V8 from the S-Class and SL. Featuring 381 horsepower and 400 lb-ft of torque, this car was aptly named “The Hammer” and accelerated to 100 km/hr in just 5 seconds. Even by modern day standards that is an impressive time.

With only twelve such cars produced, the Hammers are highly sought after by AMG collectors today.

Is the E53 coupe a Modern day AMG Hammer?

It has taken until this latest generation of E-Class coupe for Mercedes-AMG to be involved once again with an E-Class.

Mercedes’ newish 53-badged AMG vehicles are supposed to represent a perfect halfway point between the standard models and the much more expensive fire-breathing 63 variants. While it’s not a full-blooded eight-cylinder kind of AMG, since there are no plans for a 63 version of the E-Class coupe, this is currently the most powerful model that you can get in either E-Class coupe or convertible form.

To differentiate the 2022 Mercedes-AMG E53 coupe from its non-AMG stablemate, the former is marked by unique tailpipes, AMG badging, the new Panamericana-grille with vertical chrome slats, and unique AMG 20” wheels.

The large outer air inlet grille features two transverse louvres and a new front splitter. The grille also features inner Air Curtains, giving an overall aerodynamic advantage, and a subtle similarity to the AMG GT sports car family.

Kitted out in black and blacked out wheels, my car’s “murdered out” looked positively aggressive.

Under the hood is the now familiar 3.0-litre inline six-cylinder twin scroll turbocharged engine mated with an electric-starter-alternator combo for 48 volt mild-hybrid assistance. Known as EQ Boost, this system can boost fuel efficiency slightly but is really more designed to eliminate turbo lag.

The electric hybrid technology can add 21 horsepower and 184 lb-ft of torque on its own to supplement the high-tech inline-6 which produces 429 horsepower and 384 lb-ft of torque from 1,800 to 5,800 rpms.

With power flowing to all four wheels via a 9-speed AMG Speedshift dual-clutch automatic transmission and the company’s 4MATIC+ all-wheel-drive system, 0 to 100 km/hr runs can be accomplished in just 4.4 seconds, a whole 0.6 seconds quicker than the mighty “Hammer”.

The AMG DYNAMIC SELECT modes lets drivers fine-tune the E53’s performance via controls on the console or the standard steering-wheel AMG DRIVE UNIT. Five driving modes, one customizable, adapt the throttle, shifting, chassis and more from Slippery to Sport+.

The fully variable AMG Performance 4MATIC+ can send torque to the wheels that can best turn traction into action. From launch grip to cornering, 4MATIC+ can go from 50/50 front/rear, up to 100% rear-wheel-drive.

My car’s optional AMG Sport Exhaust, included in the AMG Driver’s Package, turns the rise and ebb of rpm into a rousing soundtrack. With multimode internal flaps, the different drive modes and the exhaust button lets you heighten the crescendos, or tone them down.

How does it drive?

All this tech and all of these numbers translate into impressive performance in the real-world. While the E53 coupe lacks the V8 engine and exhaust soundtrack of the AMG 63-models, the way the E53 coupe builds speed is still very impressive. Sure, it won’t pin you back in your seat like its four door E63s sibling, but it’s still very involving. The E53’s exhaust is rather unique but still pleasing under hard acceleration, particularly in Sport+ mode.

The car’s AMG RIDE CONTROL+ turns pressurized air into agility by adapting within milliseconds to changing roads, loads, and the modes of AMG DYNAMIC SELECT. It’s self-lowering and self-leveling and totally automated. At speed, the system gently supports the body while leaving it largely impervious to body roll.

Although it might be a mild-hybrid system, the E53 does not have the ability to cruise around emissions-free around town. Apart from the improved responses, you rarely notice the EQ Boost system working its magic. Aside from the very visible EQ Boost digital gauge in the speedo, you might notice that the engine shuts down earlier than you might imagine as you come to a halt.

My test vehicle was fitted with Mercedes’ semi-automomous driving system which now features a steering wheel sensor mat to recognise if you’re “hands-on”. If the driver does not have their hands on the steering wheel for a certain time, a warning is displayed in subsequent annoyance until Emergency Brake Assist.

Compared to other Mercedes models, I found the system too sensitive, frequently telling me to keep my hands on the wheel when they were already indeed on the steering wheel.

Aside from these little niggles, the E53 coupe is perfectly at home cruising at 200 km/hr on the autobahn or carving up some backroads on the weekend. You could easily drive this car from dusk till dawn and still feel relaxed on the other end. In this sense, it is a proper E-Class.

On the inside

Although the cabin is shared with other E-Class models, the extensive optional carbon fibre trim fitted to my test vehicle was drop dead gorgeous. It truly brings a different vibe to the cabin when compared to the open pore wood trim option that was fitted to my 2021 Mercedes-AMG E63s wagon test vehicle.

The sporty and comfortable seats provide strong lateral support which translates into comfort during long drives. They come in either Artico man-made leather or Dinamica microfibre in black with an AMG-specific design, red contrasting topstitching and the AMG badge, characteristic for the 53 models.

Aside from the AMG Drive Control unit on the latest AMG Steering wheel, the AMG badging in the virtual dashboard and the AMG apps in the MBUX Infotainment system, there is little else to give the game away (on the inside anyway) that this is special AMG model.

Some people may like this, but others may subscribe to the thinking from BMW’s M Division. That is to say that M cars have a bit more glitz, glamour, and pantomime.

The 2022 E53 coupe’s four seats and a 435-litre trunk give it more than adequate practicality for four adults and their luggage. There are all the accoutrements you could possibly need, from seatbelt extenders, to heated/ventilated seats.

Curiously, Mercedes-AMG also chose to leave in the AirScarf neck warmer option from the E-Class cabriolet. While this system is designed to warm-up passengers during top-down motoring, it was nonetheless a welcome but unexpected addition to the E53 coupe.

On that point, the addition of 4Matic+ all-wheel-drive also means that the E53 coupe is an all-weather vehicle, able to hit the ski chalets’ snow covered driveways or the golf course with equal comfort and presence.

Final thoughts

While it may lack the exclusivity of the 300CE Hammer, the 2022 Mercedes-AMG E53 4matic+ coupe is worthy at taking up the baton as the latest AMG four-seater two-door E-Class coupe.

Although coupes and cabriolets are sold in relatively small numbers compared to SUVs, this vehicle seems to be a worthy successor to continue Mercedes-Benz’s long tradition of producing sporty and elegant two-door cars with style and performance.

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